Massage Therapy Canada

Features Practice Technique
Biography: Spring 2003

I was born and raised in Toronto. I spent the first 2 years of my life roaming around South America with my groovy parents and older brother. My mother instilled in me a love of the outdoors and travelling from birth. I have always been intrigued by the Canadian north and had wanted to visit it from as early as I can remember.


September 17, 2009
By Massage Therapy Magazine

Topics

Tell us a little about yourself?
I was born and raised in Toronto. I spent the first 2 years of my life roaming around South America with my groovy parents and older brother. My mother instilled in me a love of the outdoors and travelling from birth. I have always been intrigued by the Canadian north and had wanted to visit it from as early as I can remember.

I got the opportunity in 1995 when a locum position came up in Yellowknife. I knew within 10 days of arriving that it was the place for me and informed the clinic I was working at that they had better find some space for me because I wasn’t going anywhere. I now co-own the clinic with Darlene Robertson and love the place where I live and work.

jennifer_stranart 
Jennifer Stranart


 

While we work hard up here, the proximity to the wilderness provides ample opportunity to do all the outdoor things I love. Kite skiing throughout our long northern winters, and sailing and canoeing in the summer.

Advertisment

Professional Profile:
I graduated from Sutherland-Chan in 1991. At the time, I was the youngest student (18) admitted into their program. I worked in private practice in Toronto from 1991-1994 and at Physiotherapy on Bay where I had the opportunity to work with Karen Orlando and other incredible physiotherapists in an efficient and
healing team atmosphere.

I served on the Executive of the Northwest Territories Sports Medicine Council and was an OMTA Board Member, currently a CMTA board member and V-P of the Northwest Territories Massage Therapist Association.

Since 1995, I have worked in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. I came for three months and have been here for eight years, with no plans on leaving I have continued my education with post-grad training in Arthrokinetic therapy, strain-counterstrain, muscle energy techniques, Certified Yamuna Body Rolling Instructor, Diagnosis and Treatment of Muscle Imbalances.

I taught anatomy and physiology for the YWCA fitness leadership program as well as workshops on massage, aromatherapy, abdominal training, Yamuna Body Rolling, indications for breast massage, stress management and more.

Influential people or experiences leading you to this profession and career.
While at university, I underwent knee surgery and was suffering from pain a year later. I went to a chiropractor that worked trigger points in my vastus medialis and lateralis and, poof, the pain was gone. I was already familiar with massage therapy at the time and decided that it was the path for me. I left university and signed up at Sutherland-Chan that fall.

Most cherished experience or accomplishment. Why?
My work is full of cherished experiences. Helping people find relief from pain that has been nagging at them for years is fantastic. I love taking time to help my clients understand why they are in pain, where it is coming from and, most importantly, what they can do about it. I think we facilitate the healing process, we don’t fix people. We use techniques to re-educate the body and then re-educate the client.

I think one of the most important milestones in my career was, unfortunately, being hit by a car. I was in a wheelchair for six weeks and off work for four months. I learned first-hand the importance of early, effective intervention as I had the benefit of first-rate physio and massage therapy right away.

I also learned how much the client needs to participate in their recovery (a LOT!!) if they have any hope of returning to their pre-accident condition.

Hope for our profession in the near and distant future.
Massage therapy has developed into so much more than ‘rubbing’ the body and increasing circulation. With muscle energy, craniosacral, and innumerable other techniques, massage is just one part of the many techniques we bring to our treatments. It is my hope that we will find ourselves being called ‘manual therapists’ which, I think, encompasses more of what we do. But at the same time, I want to remember that one of the most important things we do is simply touch people.

Words of wisdom:
I think that we are very privileged to be able to touch people as we do. People place a great deal of trust in us, and we are one of the very few professions left that are ‘allowed’ to touch their clients/patients. It is an honor for us and an important benefit for our clients.


Print this page

Related



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*