Don Quinn Dillon

Don Quinn Dillon

Don Quinn Dillon is a registered massage therapist, author, speaker and mentor. Find him at www.massagetherapist.com

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A decade ago, I reviewed the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) in preparation for dramatic changes in submitting auto insurance claims.  I recall thinking how limited the list of conditions is in relation to soft-tissue dysfunction.
Massage therapists frequently provide progressive care, addressing acute spasm/strain and pain (and the anxiousness which accompanies these symptoms) to improve function and provide a sense of well-being. Our eventual goal is to instill agency in our patients, providing self-care techniques they can apply themselves to ameliorate symptoms.
As a massage therapist, I appreciate and benefit from the relationship between our professional association and our regulatory body.
Dynamic Health Therapy, owned and operated by Sean-Michael Latimour, a registered massage therapist, and his wife Adrianne, has become a focal point of health and wellness in Keswick, Ont. What’s more, the couple has figured out how to scale up and create a highly lucrative business model.
There's been another arrest of a massage therapist charged with inappropriate or sexual touching. The year 2016 yielded a number of similar media reports regarding Canadian massage therapists. While the number of complaints against registered massage therapists are relatively small, we might be concerned about the quality of media coverage in these events, how they affect public perception, and the process by which the public are filing complaints.
Chiropractic is included in St. Michael’s Hospital services in Toronto. In fact, chiropractic is a salaried position in a number of Canadian hospitals, confirms Dr. Deborah Kopansky-Giles, a chiropractor and clinician-scientist on staff in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto.
In this episode of Practice Points, Don Dillon talks about RMTs' pricing strategy and the best way to set the right price for the service you provide. Is your massage therapy service optimally priced?For more on this topic, check out Dillon's article, Pricing your massage therapy service.
I've been deliberating for some time over whether to raise my professional service fees. My practice is located in a small city where an automaker – the major industry in this town – laid off thousands of workers years ago. Tourism and other industries have suffered, and I suspect many shopkeepers and service providers have wrestled with their pricing decisions for fear of customer reprisal. It causes me to reflect on how I, and my colleagues, set pricing.
In this episode of Practice Points, Don Dillon talks about revisiting a practitioner's delivery of care model and thinking about ways to deliver the best possible patient outcomes in a more efficient yet effective manner. For more on this topic, also read Dillon's article, Tools, team, technology.
Any massage therapist practicing for a length of time typically confronts two obstacles: work capacity is limited by the strength and endurance of the practitioner and second, income is directly limited by work capacity. Subject to fatigue and wear-and-tear from years of caring for others, a massage therapist's work capacity and income can descend a slippery slope over the length of their career.
In this episode of Practice Points, Don Dillon tackles the issue of proposed regulation of health care clinics in Ontario, and presents some possible alternatives for the massage therapy profession and other stakeholders to consider.For more on this topic, read Dillon's article, Proposed Ontario Clinic Regulation - An Alternative.
A number of years ago I conducted my practice out of a fitness club. In the busy lobby it was common that, while awaiting my next appointment, an existing patron would approach me.  
Ontario clinic regulation was proposed late 2015 by 13 regulatory health colleges, including the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario, to address perceived wide-spread infractions committed by businesses employing regulated health professionals.
In the increasingly changing marketplace for massage therapists, do you have what it takes to take on the corporate world? In this latest episode of Practice Points, Don Dillon discusses employment as a viable option for massage therapists and cited some of the challenges employers are finding when hiring RMTs. If you're considering employment as a career option for your massage therapy practice, reflect on these important points to make yourself employable.
What trends are occurring in the marketplace that are directly affecting the massage therapy profession? In this episode of Practice Points, Don Dillon discusses several changes in the marketplace that professionals should be aware of and be prepared for. Read more on this in Dillon's article, Breakthrough: Tangible opportunities for massage therapy practice.
Speaking at the 2015 Massage Therapy Canada Business Forum, Don Dillon, gave his insights on the state of the RMT profession, the successes and missed opportunities, and offered some suggestions on how to further advance the profession.
In this second episode of Practice Points, Don Dillon talks about some of the features in massage practice management software he would like to see and some he can do without. Dillon expounds on these points in his article, Wanted: Practice software.Practice Points with Don Dillon is a new web video series featuring Don Dillon's insights and commentaries on developments that affect the massage therapy profession.
Practice Points with Don Dillon is a new web video series featuring Don Dillon's insights and commentaries on developments that affect the massage therapy profession. In this first episode, Dillon discusses ways to positively affect insurer perceptions about the massage therapy profession and position massage therapists as an important component of health care promotion and disease prevention.Dillon, a massage therapist, is a sought after speaker, author and thought leader in the profession.For more on what the profession can do to change perceptions by insurers, read Dillon's artice, Breaking down ill perceptions.
Charting is an essential component of a massage therapist's practice. Beyond regulatory record-keeping requirements, charting provokes a practitioner to listen attentively and analyze critically when capturing a subject's case history, measuring benchmark neuro-musculoskeletal and quality of life indicators and comparing these to post-session outcomes. Charting and forming a treatment plan provides the compass, keeping the practitioner on track toward realizing patient/client objectives.
I haven’t made the leap to practice software yet, and I’m quite motivated to get there. There are many impressive features available from over a dozen vendors, but there are some features I’m still waiting to be integrated.
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