Massage Therapy Canada

Features Research
From the Editor: Fall 2009

In this issue of Massage Therapy Canada, we highlight massage therapists in the spa setting. There are varying opinions about the “professional environment” for massage therapy; how it should or should not be represented and which modalities are considered to be complementary or contradictory.


October 23, 2009
By Jill Rogers

Topics

In this issue of Massage Therapy Canada, we highlight massage therapists in the spa setting. There are varying opinions about the “professional environment” for massage therapy; how it should or should not be represented and which modalities are considered to be complementary or contradictory. Whether by human nature or personal impact, negative opinion on the spa setting is far more often shared.

In this issue we offer an informative and positive view and hope it evokes responses from you, the reader. This issue includes a variety of articles addressing massage and spa, including our cover story The Spa and Spa Practitioners: A Trendy Reality. Also included is a piece on spa ethics as well as views from several RMTs working in this environment.

Feel free to forward your views on the spa setting and where and what the “professional environment” should look like in general to jrogers@annexweb.com.

Also in this issue is the second contribution in our ongoing  “State of the Industry” series from Don Dillon, RMT. Don presents information that asks us, as the title suggests, to Take the Spa Industry Seriously.

Out and About

I thoroughly enjoyed attending the Ontario Massage Trade Conference in Burlington, Ont., Sept. 19-20, 2009. It was great to see old friends and colleagues and meet and speak with new ones. In speaking with RMTs, wearing my newly fitted editorial hat, many topics of both interest and concern were discussed. I am looking, as always, to you, the reader, for topics that we should cover, and for ideas about how we can communicate through the magazine as a professional community.

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One topic that seemed quite passionately voiced was that of new clients sharing negative and often appalling behaviour from fellow therapists. The communication involved to re-establish trust in the new massage therapist is considerable and the potential harm this causes for other massage therapists in the community and at large is upsetting and most detrimental. Aside from the responsibility of a massage therapist to report, or assist clients in reporting, unethical behaviour to our regulating bodies, there is accountability to fellow therapists for professional and responsible care. If you would like to contribute to Massage Therapy Canada magazine on this topic, please contact me at jrogers@annexweb.com and send a quick note describing your potential submission.

Look for our newly designed website, www.massagetherapycanada.com, which provides news, event listings, our online digital version and many other resourceful features at your fingertips.

Yours in Health,

Jill Rogers RMT
jrogers@annexweb.com


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