Massage Therapy Canada

Features Management Operations
From the publisher: Winter 2006

The phrase “Tools of the Trade” is a commonly used expression describing what a person might require, or use, to carry out one’s daily work. Many companies across the spectrum implement advanced technologies and resources to increase production, while reducing production time and ultimately increasing revenue.
Massage therapy has, and always will be, a “unique” trade (profession). It is the only manual trade that can only truly be performed by hand. Literally by hand. When I pondered the phrase “tools of the trade,” I thought, other than our tables, lotion and our hands, is there really anything else?


September 28, 2009
By Jill Rogers

Topics

The phrase “Tools of the Trade” is a commonly used expression describing what a person might require, or use, to carry out one’s daily work. Many companies across the spectrum implement advanced technologies and resources to increase production, while reducing production time and ultimately increasing revenue.
Massage therapy has, and always will be, a “unique” trade (profession). It is the only manual trade that can only truly be performed by hand. Literally by hand. When I pondered the phrase “tools of the trade,” I thought, other than our tables, lotion and our hands, is there really anything else?

In actual fact, there is. At our disposal, we have, what we could refer to as, “complementary tools of the trade” New equipment, enhanced equipment, lubricants, intellectual resources, such as books, magazines, and research. Therapists could function without “complementary tools of the trade,” but should we?

Obviously, there is merit in utilizing products that aid in therapist health, extending professional life, but there is additional “value in service” offered through therapists being as current, and informed as possible. So, a shovel might not be a tool of our trade, but we should always be digging for ideas, knowledge and products that do enhance what the massage therapy profession can offer the public.

In this issue, we have assembled a few reviews that describe tools of our trade and we have added “tools of the trade” as a new regular feature in future issues of MTC. We will introduce something in each issue that can be described as a “tool of the trade.”

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Along with our regular columns, in this issue we also present; extensive results from the RMT musculoskeletal injury survey conducted by the University of New Brunswick and the Atlantic College of Massage Therapy; an excellent thesis discussing the assessment and treatment of Scoliosis; and a look at when symptoms experienced in the hand, are not necessarily carpal tunnel syndrome.

As always, we look to you our readers, for feedback and participation in the creation of each issue of Massage Therapy Canada magazine. Write or e-mail your thoughts and submissions. We want to hear from you!

Sincerely,
Jill Rogers, RMT


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