Health News
Hot water treatment may help improve inflammation and blood sugar (glucose) levels in people who are unable to exercise, according to a new study. The findings are published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
It's a posture so common we almost don't notice it anymore: someone sitting at a computer jutting his or her head forward to look more closely at the screen. 
HALIFAX—A lack of access to primary health care is an ongoing problem in Nova Scotia and the province's opposition leaders say they will push the Liberal government to improve the situation in 2019.
When Tammy McEvoy was asked to share her time and crafting talents to engage with other patients at her local health centre, she ended up getting back as much as she gave – maybe more.
Vancouver Career College will be moving from its location on Pandosy Avenue in early January. Whether or not it moves out of Kelowna remains to be seen.
OTTAWA — A new study suggests women are more likely than men to experience workplace harassment, and that it's more common in health-related fields.
Withdrawing one's hand to avoid injury and soothing the pain of that injury are two distinct evolutionary responses, but their molecular origins and signaling pathways have eluded scientists thus far.
Exercising on a regular basis over a lifetime may help keep the body decades younger, says new research from Ball State University.
A new study commissioned by Medisys Health Group, in collaboration with Edelman and LegerWeb, reveals that Canadian employees are demanding healthcare at their fingertips — apps that let individuals connect directly and instantly with nurse practitioners, physicians and other health professionals through secure text and video chat, anytime and anywhere.
Even if you are a fit and healthy person with no signs of any heart or blood vessel disease, low cardiorespiratory fitness could be a warning sign of future problems, according to a study published in the European Heart Journal.
A recent Arthritis Research Canada study has revealed systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDS) place significant economic strain on the paid and unpaid workforce in the form of excess productivity costs.
TORONTO—Randy Davis remembers attending a social function not long after he'd been diagnosed with HIV and watching as the hostess greeted a succession of guests, giving each a warm hug. But when his turn came, the woman's hand went up and she suggested he not get too close because she had a cold.
Exercise and physical activity are good for our health, and soon Generation 100, a comprehensive study from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) on the effects of exercise on aging will be able to tell us whether exercise actually prolongs life.
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), a type of depression that comes and goes with the seasons, typically starts in the late fall and early winter and goes away during the spring and summer.
Women that underwent extreme physical training and completed a Transantarctic expedition did not show any more negative health effects than would be expected in men, according to a study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. 
For the first time, researchers at the UNC School of Medicine showed they could target one brain region with a weak alternating current of electricity, enhance the naturally occurring brain rhythms of that region, and significantly decrease symptoms associated with chronic lower back pain. 
Researchers at Boston Medical Center found that frequent, persistent back pain is associated with earlier death in a study of more than 8,000 older women who were followed for an average of 14 years. 
Data from the Global Burden of Disease Study shows that the overall health of Canadians is good and is consistent with other similar countries, and people are living longer with diseases, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) 
Becoming more sensitive to pain, or pain sensitization, is an important risk factor for developing persistent knee pain in osteoarthritis (OA), according to a new study by researchers from the Université de Montréal (UdeM) School of Rehabilitation and Hôpital Maisonneuve Rosemont Research Centre (CRHMR) in collaboration with researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM). These findings have just been published in the journal Arthritis and Rheumatology.
Problematic substance use has a very real impact on the lives of Canadians, their families and communities.

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