Health News
Policymakers should consider introducing The Daily Mile to improve the health and fitness of schoolchildren around the world, according to new research led by the Universities of Stirling and Edinburgh.
  Children and adolescents who carry backpacks aren’t at higher risk of developing back pain, according to a study published today in the British Journal of Sports Medicine (BJSM). Researchers found no evidence to suggest a link between carrying a heavy backpack and back pain in these age groups.
OTTAWA—Many Canadians with life-threatening illnesses wish to remain independent and receive the care they need in the setting of their choice. Improving access to palliative care in a variety of settings, including at home, is critical to making this happen.
Starting in October, all prescription opioids must carry a warning sticker about potential adverse effects and pharmacists will be required to provide information handouts to consumers about the potent narcotics, Health Canada announced Wednesday.
DALLAS—Wearable fitness trackers, such as Fitbits, that measure steps taken per day may be a useful tool to evaluate and help treat cancer patients, researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center have shown.
Alison Brooks, MD, MPH presented a research abstract about the impact of concussions on lower extremity injuries in high school athletes at the 27th Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine in Lake Buena Vista, FL.
In a study of adults with rheumatoid arthritis, those who were severely obese experienced more rapidly progressing disability than patients who were overweight. This was not explained by features of their arthritis, including the amount of inflammation in their joints. In the Arthritis Care & Research study, weight loss after enrollment was also associated with worsening disability, possibly as a sign of frailty.
MINNEAPOLIS – Taking frequent saunas may be linked to a lower risk of stroke, according to a study published in the May 2, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study was conducted in Finland, where saunas originated and nearly every home has one.
Soccer is the most popular sport in the world. And participation is rising in the United States, where it's widely considered a safer alternative to other contact sports like football, facing heightened scrutiny as media coverage of brain injuries among NFL players has trained a spotlight on the sport's risks.
Healthy older people who exercise regularly are less inclined to struggle to find words to express themselves, research led by the University of Birmingham has discovered.
A new analysis by Johns Hopkins researchers of national data gathered from physical activity monitors concludes that most Americans hit the sack later on Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights. Delayed bedtimes are especially pronounced for teens and young adults.
Women who've previously experienced a heart attack have twice the risk of later myocardial ischemia provoked by mental stress when compared to men with a similar history, according to a study published in Circulation.
Children not only have fatigue-resistant muscles, but recover very quickly from high-intensity exercise -- even faster than well-trained adult endurance athletes.
Researchers at the University of Michigan have engineered a new compound that animal tests suggest could offer the pain-relieving properties of opioids such as morphine and oxycodone without the risk of addiction. 
Massage Therapy Expo took place over the weekend, April 21 and 22 at the Hilton Garden Inn in Vaughan, Ont. With over 30 exhibitors, two full days of seminars and hundreds of attendees, the event allowed students of massage therapy as well as practicing RMTs to learn from some of the industry's best forward-thinkers and experts.
Bacteria in the gut, known as the gut microbiome, could be the culprit behind arthritis and joint pain that plagues people who are obese, according to a new study published today in JCI Insight.
ROCHESTER, MN – Nearly a third of patients responding to a Mayo Clinic survey said they used none of the opioids they were prescribed after surgery. The research findings, presented Thursday, April 19 at the American Surgical Association annual meeting, also show that only about 8 percent of patients disposed of their remaining opioids.
Can medical marijuana help to fight the opioid epidemic? Many believe that it can. But a new study finds that people who use medical marijuana actually have higher rates of medical and non-medical prescription drug use—including pain relievers. The study appears in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), published by Wolters Kluwer.
TORONTO – According to a new national policy paper released today by the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), decriminalization is key to solving the opioid crisis that is killing thousands of people. The paper, developed by a cross-Canada team of mental health policy and research experts in response to escalating rates of opioid-related harms, recommends a bold and effective public health approach to relieving the crisis that focuses on care, not corrections.
HAMILTON, ON—A new study from McMaster and York universities has found that poor muscle health may be a complication of Type 1 diabetes, even among active twenty-somethings.The research team analyzed muscle biopsies of young adults with and without Type 1 diabetes who exceed Diabetes Canada's recommended weekly levels for physical activity.The researchers found structural and functional changes in the power generation parts of the cell, or mitochondria, of those with diabetes. Not only were the mitochondria less capable of producing energy for the muscle, they were also releasing high amounts of toxic reactive oxygen species, related to cell damage.These changes could result in reduced metabolism, greater difficulty controlling blood glucose and, if left unchecked, an accelerated rate of developing disability. The study findings add poor muscle health to the list of better-known complications of Type 1 diabetes, including nerve damage, heart disease and kidney disorders."Now we know that even active people with diabetes have changes in their muscles that could impair their ability to manage blood sugar," said Thomas Hawke, corresponding author of the study and a professor of pathology and molecular medicine at McMaster. "Knowing in the long term that this could contribute to faster development of disability, we can start to address it early on."Christopher Perry, study co-senior author and an associate professor in kinesiology and health sciences and the Muscle Health Research Centre at York University, added: "Skeletal muscle is our largest metabolic organ and is the primary tissue for clearing blood sugar after eating a meal, so we need to keep muscle as healthy as possible."With regular aerobic exercise, the amount of mitochondria in muscle increases, thereby helping muscle cells to use more glucose and become more efficient. Given this new data, Perry added that their study suggests that current guidelines for Type 1 diabetics may also need to be revised."We believe these dysfunctional mitochondria are what's causing the muscle to not use glucose properly and to also damage muscle cells in the process. We were surprised to see the muscles were this unhealthy in young adults with Type 1 diabetes who were regularly active."Researchers say while further study is needed, revising evidence-based exercise guidelines, specific for those with Type 1 diabetes, may be required to keep them in the best health.The paper was published today in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. The study may be found HERE.The team included researchers at York University, the University of Windsor and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases as well as McMaster's departments of pathology and molecular medicine, pediatrics and kinesiology. Both Hawke and Perry are on the Board of Directors for the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology.The study was funded in part by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, and the James H. Cummings Foundation.

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