Op-Ed
We know that Canada's population is aging. Among the many statistics that have been reported is how in 2015, the proportion of Canadian seniors surpassed that of youth under 15 for the first time. The gap will continue to widen over the next 20 years.
Funding home care and long-term care is fast becoming the main challenge of our outdated medicare system.The system was developed in the mid-20th century for a young population that mostly required acute care from hospitals and physicians. But that need is changing rapidly with our aging population.
The world was shocked when news of the death of yet another legendary music icon broke last week. Prince, who was well known for hits like "Kiss" and "When Doves Cry," was found dead in his home in Minneapolis.
Patient-centred care is currently dominating many discussions in the health care community and promises to continue to be a hot topic of conversation moving forward. It was certainly the theme for many health care conferences I’ve attended this past year.
Ontario clinic regulation was proposed late 2015 by 13 regulatory health colleges, including the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario, to address perceived wide-spread infractions committed by businesses employing regulated health professionals.
All across Canada provincial governments are grappling with ever growing healthcare demands in the face of shrinking resources. Our enviable publicly funded health system is now well into a downward spiral of unenviable disrepair. As patients are becoming more knowledgeable about their own care, and as doctors develop a wider array of options available to treat diseases, the costs are increasing.
Remember going through your program as a massage therapy student? To me it felt like I was a little fish in a big ocean. It involved years of intensity, no life outside of school, all those internships, examinations, testing and tons of stress – then the board examinations, more anxiety and the continuous expense. How did it feel to finally get your practise number? I was excited, relieved, somewhat overwhelmed and, not to forget the most important fact, I was finally a professional. Suddenly, I felt like the big whale.
Today marks the 6th year of the Bell Let's Talk Day, a national campaign to raise awareness about mental illness and get people talking about this invisible disability that affects one in five Canadians.
Our profession can be guilty of floating some pretty novel notions. As a practitioner, practice manager, lecturer, trainer and previous assessor in the auto-insurance realm, I have seen convictions RMTs treat as factual – even gospel – without critically examining their plausibility.  
This year is ending with a somewhat positive development from Manitoba, which can potentially have a big impact on massage therapists across the country.
Massage therapy in hospitals is not a new thing – as RMTs have been working in hospitals in Canada for at least three decades now – but it had been a slow progress.
In the last few months Canadians have been subjected to political debates, catchy sound bites, media ads and social media bickering – all for the purposes of scoring political points and winning votes.
Charting is an essential component of a massage therapist's practice. Beyond regulatory record-keeping requirements, charting provokes a practitioner to listen attentively and analyze critically when capturing a subject's case history, measuring benchmark neuro-musculoskeletal and quality of life indicators and comparing these to post-session outcomes. Charting and forming a treatment plan provides the compass, keeping the practitioner on track toward realizing patient/client objectives.
An April 13th article in the Toronto Star titled, “Rise of the Three Amigos in Health Care,” clearly illustrates how far we have to climb in building insurer relations.
The 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games being held in Toronto this summer will be one of the biggest international events the city has ever hosted.
What follows is a letter to the editor I recently sent to The Toronto Star’s Adam Mayers, in regards to Mayer’s article published on April 13 titled, The Rise of the Three Amigos of Health Care.
The popularity of massage therapy has waxed and waned in North American culture, but its greatest push came with the massive economic boom in post-World War industrial and information eras.
Throughout 2014, Massage Therapy Canada has been reporting on developments in the massage therapy profession across Canada through our Regional Focus series.
Emerging developments in the massage therapy profession suggest a surge in cross-Canada collaboration, a pooling of resources and perhaps a more cohesive, potent profession.
The isolated nature of a massage therapist’s practice is something we often hear from industry observers and has always been cited as one of the many challenges facing massage therapists.
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