Research
New research provides insight into a long-observed but little-understood connection between chronic pain and anxiety, and offers a potential target for treatment.
FREDERICTON – Researchers at the University of New Brunswick have launched a study to find out whether a protein drink can help build muscle – without exercise.
Massage therapy shows promise for reducing pain intensity and severity, as well as fatigue and anxiety in cancer populations compared to the active comparators evaluated in a new systematic review.
Women who do the same tasks as men often face a higher risk of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in their neck and upper limbs, according to a researcher from McGill University in Montreal.
Inability to manage negative emotional and somatic stress is associated with opioid misuse in adults with chronic pain, according to new research reported in The Journal of Pain, published by the American Pain Society,
LONDON, ONT. – Researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute have developed clinical practice guidelines for managing neuropathic pain with patients who have experienced a spinal cord injury (SCI). Lawson Health claims the document is the first of its kind in Canada.
LOUDON, N.H. – He was one of NASCAR's first superstars, but Fred Lorenzen's memories of his Hall of Fame career have dimmed as he battles dementia. His Daytona 500 victory, the wins he piled up to become NASCAR's first $100,000 driver, his life on the road, all have been largely extinguished.
OTTAWA – The Canadian military is trying out a "bionic" knee brace developed by a Halifax-based company.
Funding competition for the 2016 Massage Therapy Research Fund (MTRF) is now open and applications for research funding are now being accepted, the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario (CMTO) has announced.
The potential of light as a non-invasive, highly-focused alternative to pain medication was made more apparent thanks to research conducted by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre.
Older people are increasingly active, and this lifestyle shift has contributed to the rise in average age of a person experiencing a spinal cord injury.
An abundance of fascia science and clinical understandings were featured at the Fourth International Fascia Research Congress, held last November in Boston. Following are some of the highlights from the fascia conference that I find worth sharing with fellow massage therapy professionals.
Breaking a major bone may increase risk of widespread chronic body pain in later life, a new study has found.
It may seem counterintuitive that exercise could help people with arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions, but a new study finds that a low-impact exercise program is improving quality of life for many older adults with these conditions.
That sense of well-being, freedom and extra energy that runners often experience is not just a matter of endorphins. A study at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) shows that the "runner's high" phenomenon is also caused by dopamine, an important neurotransmitter for motivation.
The Institute for Work and Health (IWH) is now accepting abstracts for presentation proposals for the 19th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (Premus 2016).
Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords, according to a new study funded in part by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH).
A new study suggests children with multiple sclerosis (MS) who exercise regularly may have a less active disease. The research is published in the August 12, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Developing any habit – good or bad – starts with a routine, and exercise is no exception. The trick is making exercise a habit that is hard to break. According to a new Iowa State University study, that may be easier to accomplish by focusing on cues that make going for a run or to the gym automatic.
New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) challenges the common belief that males and females process pain in the same way.

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