Research
Older people are increasingly active, and this lifestyle shift has contributed to the rise in average age of a person experiencing a spinal cord injury.
An abundance of fascia science and clinical understandings were featured at the Fourth International Fascia Research Congress, held last November in Boston. Following are some of the highlights from the fascia conference that I find worth sharing with fellow massage therapy professionals.
Breaking a major bone may increase risk of widespread chronic body pain in later life, a new study has found.
It may seem counterintuitive that exercise could help people with arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions, but a new study finds that a low-impact exercise program is improving quality of life for many older adults with these conditions.
That sense of well-being, freedom and extra energy that runners often experience is not just a matter of endorphins. A study at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) shows that the "runner's high" phenomenon is also caused by dopamine, an important neurotransmitter for motivation.
The Institute for Work and Health (IWH) is now accepting abstracts for presentation proposals for the 19th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (Premus 2016).
Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords, according to a new study funded in part by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH).
A new study suggests children with multiple sclerosis (MS) who exercise regularly may have a less active disease. The research is published in the August 12, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Developing any habit – good or bad – starts with a routine, and exercise is no exception. The trick is making exercise a habit that is hard to break. According to a new Iowa State University study, that may be easier to accomplish by focusing on cues that make going for a run or to the gym automatic.
New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) challenges the common belief that males and females process pain in the same way.
More than 35,000 college athletes and cadets at U.S. service academies are helping researchers write a new, extensive and groundbreaking chapter in the study and tracking of concussions.
Fighting climate change will bring important public health benefits around the world, says a study in a top medical journal. Failing to meet that challenge could undo 50 year's worth of progress in global public health, according to The Lancet.
It looks like back pain is affecting more men in their younger years, according to a new report from the British Chiropractic Association (BCA). A consumer research study conducted by the BCA determined that the average age when men feel the strain of back and neck pains is 37. The study surveyed 2,127 U.K. adults of which 908 were men between the ages of 16 and 55+.
Funding from the Mark Cuban Foundation, run by the well-known owner of the Dallas Mavericks, will allow University of Michigan scientists and physicians to study how human growth hormone may aid recovery from an ACL tear – one of the most frequent, traumatic and dreaded knee injuries among athletes.
Commuting length, distance and means are stress factors that can lead to burnout, according to a new study from the University of Montreal.
Researchers from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont., may have uncovered the body’s secret to physically aging well and keeping muscle strength in tact.
Fibromyalgia is the second most common rheumatic disorder behind osteoarthritis and, though still widely misunderstood, is now considered to be a lifelong central nervous system disorder, which is responsible for amplified pain that shoots through the body in those who suffer from it. Daniel Clauw, a medical doctor and professor of anesthesiology, University of Michigan, analyzed the neurological basis for fibromyalgia in a plenary session address at the recent American Pain Society Annual Scientific Meeting.
Detailed gait analysis reveals that people with clogged leg arteries rely more on muscles in the back of the calf when they walk to compensate for weakness in certain hip muscles, according to a new study presented at the American Heart Association's Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology/Peripheral Vascular Disease Scientific Sessions 2015.
Dehydration may not be the threat to sporting performance that athletes have been led to believe, a new study suggests.
New research from the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids confirms several “disconnects” in the pain-related communication between health-care prescribers of prescription opiates and their patients. The new data was fielded by the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, in collaboration with the American Cancer Society, the American Academy of Pain Management and Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals to gain a better understanding of the interactions between opiate-prescribing health-care providers and patients.

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