Research
Dehydration may not be the threat to sporting performance that athletes have been led to believe, a new study suggests.
New research from the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids confirms several “disconnects” in the pain-related communication between health-care prescribers of prescription opiates and their patients. The new data was fielded by the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, in collaboration with the American Cancer Society, the American Academy of Pain Management and Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals to gain a better understanding of the interactions between opiate-prescribing health-care providers and patients.
A team of crack researchers finally may have solved the mystery of knuckle-popping. In a study published recently, University of Alberta scientists describe how modern imaging technology has shed new light on the age-old riddle of why some joints crack when you pull them.
Researchers from Simon Fraser University (SFU) in British Columbia believe they may have found a link between back pain and human evolution. SFU post-doctoral fellow Kimberly Plomp, a biological anthropologist, has been studying ancient bones for disease and injury that provide insight about our ancestors’ health and how they lived, according to a SFU news report written by Diane Luckow.
Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill, is conducting a clinical trial on two physical therapy regimens to treat plantar fasciitis, which causes stabbing heel pain.
Researchers at Emory University in Atlanta, Ga., are investigating how massage therapy can help reduce fatigue in breast cancer patients. This recent study is part of a series of clinical trials at Emory to study the biological benefits of massage therapy, according to an article posted on the school’s website.
Two University of British Columbia (UBC) doctors may soon be releasing results of their study on the effects of massage therapy on stress and inflammation caused by individuals working night shifts. This clinical research, funded by a seed grant from the Registered Massage Therapists’ Association of British Columbia (RMTBC), commenced in February 2014 and was schedule for completion last February.
Otago University’s School of Physiotherapy will run the first clinical evaluation of laser treatment for lymphoedema in New Zealand, on behalf of the NZ Breast Cancer Foundation.
Before concussions were a hot-button topic in hockey, Steve Montador knew all about the impact of head injuries. Five years ago, while he was still playing in the NHL, Montador committed to donating his brain to future research. Dr. Charles Tator of the University of Toronto told that story at Montador's memorial service Saturday in Mississauga, Ont. It's one final showing of generosity that many of his friends and former teammates didn't know about.
The American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) has announced a new partnership with Team Roger C. Peace to co-sponsor the paracycling team and fund the gathering of data on the impact of massage therapy on the conditioning and performance of these professional athletes. The athletes will prominently display AMTA’s name and logo as they compete, and massage therapy will be closely associated with their training and conditioning in this first of a kind study, the association said.
Nov. 14, 2014 – A new study from Chicago’s Northwester University shows cigarette smoking can be bad for the back, finding that smokers are three times more likely than nonsmokers to develop chronic back pain.
New research, funded in part by the U.S. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), suggests that some of the bacteria that share the human body manufacture antibiotics and that these substances may be capable of fighting infection.
Oct. 21, 2014 – A Toronto scientist has launched a five-year research program that aims to look at how gender-related factors affect differences in work injury risks, return-to-work and illnesses between male and female workers.
Many already view massage as an important approach to relieving muscle pain or as a means to relax. However, working with a qualified massage therapist can also play a significant role in improving cardiovascular health as evidenced by a growing body of research, according to the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA).
Oct. 8, 2014 – Rheumatoid arthritis is a very painful and tiring condition and, not long ago, being diagnosed with it usually meant having to leave the workforce. But improvements in treatment mean more people can now remain at work in spite of their rheumatoid arthritis. Though their productivity levels at work may lag, especially during flare-ups, it’s common today to see people with this condition cycle through phases of missing work, struggling through work, and being fully functional and symptom-free.
Oct. 3, 2014 – Thirteen research projects totaling approximately $21.7 million over five years will explore nondrug approaches to managing pain and related health conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), drug abuse and sleep issues. The effort seeks to enhance options for the management of pain and associated problems in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families.
Oct. 2, 2014 – The U.S. National Multiple Sclerosis Society has committed nearly US$19 million to support an expected 54 new MS research projects. These are part of a comprehensive research strategy aimed at stopping MS, restoring function that has been lost, and ending the disease forever.
Sept. 11, 2014 – Leading researchers and industry experts gathered in Ottawa to discuss how to accelerate the development of new treatments and technologies to help people with dementia, their families and caregivers.
Sept. 4, 2014 – Researchers at the University of Calgary say they may be getting closer to figuring out the mysteries of chronic pain. Dr. Gerald Zamponi, a neuroscientist with the university's Hotchkiss Brain Institute, says they've discovered that with people who suffer chronic pain, there's a biochemical change.
August 26, 2014 – Canadian doctors have begun using stem cell transplants to treat “stiff person syndrome,” a rare neurological condition in which a patient's leg and other muscles suddenly contract painfully, often leaving them immobilized like a tin soldier. The disorder, which affects an estimated one in a million people, occurs when the immune system turns against a person's own tissues, in this case attacking cells in the brain and spinal cord.

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine Renew

Most Popular

Latest Events

Massage Therapy Expo 2018
April 21-22, 2018