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Contibutor to Our Profession: Winter 2003

I was born in South Africa and immigrated to Canada in my early 20s. Dabbled in a number of professions before I found my calling in complementary health care. Married to Barbara, my wonderful wife. We are one another’s biggest fans.


September 24, 2009
By Massage Therapy Magazine

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Biography.jpg

Jonathan Maister


Tell us a little about yourself:
I was born in South Africa and immigrated to Canada in my early 20s. Dabbled in a number of professions before I found my calling in complementary health care. Married to Barbara, my wonderful wife. We are one another’s biggest fans. Pastimes: Travel (when time permits), current affairs (I was offered Green Party Candidacy in my riding), fitness, history, nature.
 
Professional profile:
I have a Degree in Social Sciences from the University of Cape Town. Diploma in Sports Injury Management from Sheridan College, Diploma in Massage Therapy, ICT Kikkawa College. In private practice in Markham Ontario. Teach part-time at ICT Kikkawa College. Author, contributor to a number of journals/publications.

Influential people or experiences leading you to this profession and career:
Worked with a number of high profile Massage Therapists at the World Indoor Track & Field Championships in Toronto (1993). Felt inspired enough to add Massage Therapy to my skills. A number of Massage Therapists at that event piqued my interest – I recall Ed Ratz, Grace Chan, John D’Aguanno among others. Mike DePodesta, probably the pioneer of combining Athletic Therapy and Massage Therapy, was the single biggest influence. I had the pleasure of working with him at Seneca College for an entire academic year.

Most cherished experience or accomplishment:
I recall treating a masters track athlete with vague hip or abdominal pain. It was one of those scenarios where you know it isn’t orthopedic and you go with your intuition. My only clue was a scar which he indicated was from prostate surgery. Using a combination of three cranial and other osteopathic type techniques (this was really winging it!) I cured him in about 20 minutes. This man was amazed but I think no more than I was. It was then that I realized of the power of my own skills.

Hope for our profession in the future:

We deserve the respect of the “mainstream” medical community. There are some very capable practitioners in our midst and their skills must be recognized.

Words of wisdom:
It goes with the turf: Patients come, patients go. You succeed in healing some patients. With others, it’s futile. Some days you are on form, other days everything seems below par. If you can’t accept these facts, don’t choose health care as a profession. Cut yourself some slack, you’re only human.


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