Marketing
After more than ten years of social media, one could argue that companies and their owners are still shouting instead of listening, promoting instead of educating, or following company policies instead of customer needs. This kind of behavior will only lead to less interest, less loyalty and fewer sales.
For those of you who have created a LinkedIn profile just because it seemed like the right thing to do, consider this your secret strategy session to finding new opportunities, new clients, or just keeping on top of industry news.
According to a study commissioned by GoDaddy, 60 per cent of small businesses don't have a website. Factor in that, according to Google, 97 per cent of consumers search online for businesses and products before making a purchase, and it could be argued that having a professional website is essential for success. Regardless of your industry, your website needs to accomplish some key objectives.
If your business isn't already on social media, I'm sure you've at least thought about it. According to eMarketer, 88 per cent of businesses use social media as a marketing tool. And yet, a 2015 study by Simply Measured showed that 60 per cent of companies don't know if their social media efforts are even working.
RMT and media personality Margaret Wallis-Duffy presented at the recent Massage Therapy Canada Business Forum on how the profession can thrive in a multidisciplinary practice. In her presentation, she emphasized several elements that are vital for the RMT practice to succeed and flourish.
Nothing is more influential than word of mouth when it comes to making a buying decision. The challenge for most businesses is they can't influence or control what their customer will say, when they say it, and to whom.
The 2013 Pew Internet & American Life Project by Pew Research Center found that 59 per cent of American adults had looked online for health information in the previous year (72 per cent of all adult internet users), with the most popular issues being specific diseases and treatments.
For many business owners, the lure of social media is hard to resist. It offers the ability to reach and engage their market on their own terms, to promote their products and services, and the freedom to do it all from the kitchen table or smart phone. And the best part is that it's free. Or is it?
We are often asked to provide guidance on how website content should be written for optimal results. What we advise is you need to be aware that your content must be written to appeal to two very different audiences: the search engine robots and the human site visitors.
Up until a few years ago, not only did people share almost every post and tweet they found the least bit interesting, they would routinely thank others for doing the same. This resulted in both companies and individuals having the ability to build large, engaged followings, which could potentially be leveraged to generate business.
How we communicate today is vastly different from how we did just a few years ago. Texting, social media, and quick emails have become the preferred method over more traditional channels. However, it can be argued that this trend has resulted in older methods being more impactful and effective. After all, when was the last time you marked a handwritten letter as spam?
RMT, author and speaker Andrea Collins discusses some practical ways massage therapists can raise their profile in their community to build your practice, help bring in new patients and enhance patient retention and referral. Collins was a speaker at the 2015 Massage Therapy Canada Business Forum held last September.
Navigating the world of online marketing, health-care practitioners and clinic owners need practical tips and insights on how to use blogs as a marketing strategy to enhance patient base and increase credibility. Online marketing expert Andrei Petrik showed how blogging need not be as complicated, time consuming and brain draining as one might think.
Many businesses live or die by the reviews they receive. The problem is that negative reviews can be unfair, exaggerated or just untrue. And in these cases it's tempting to lash out at the author, resulting in an online war of words.
The last time we spoke on the subject of search engine optimization (SEO) was in 2011, so it is high time for an update.
Having a blog can certainly help your practice connect with potential, current and past clients.
Jeri Denomy didn’t mean to upset anyone. Still, the Owen Sound, Ont., RMT made a handful of folks angry when she published her blog post on myomassology last summer.
Social media has come a long way since it was first introduced to the online world.
After a long week at work, who wouldn’t love a good massage? However, many people may find it difficult deciding exactly where or who to go to. Having a blog can certainly help your practice to connect with potential, current and past clients. It’s a way to share ideas (techniques) impart information (latest trends in the field) and solicit feedback (potential testimonials). And it’s a way to showcase yourself and/or your practice and give readers reasons to select your business over someone else’s. 
Massage therapy professionals, products and service providers gathered in Burlington, Ont., last September for the first annual Massage Therapy Canada Business Forum.
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