Health News
ROCHESTER, MN – Nearly a third of patients responding to a Mayo Clinic survey said they used none of the opioids they were prescribed after surgery. The research findings, presented Thursday, April 19 at the American Surgical Association annual meeting, also show that only about 8 percent of patients disposed of their remaining opioids.
OTTAWA — The Trudeau government is rejecting a call from its own backbenchers to decriminalize all illicit drug use in Canada – just days before Liberals are set to debate the idea at a national convention in Halifax.A so-called priority resolution put forward by the national Liberal caucus for debate at the convention calls on the government to treat illegal drug use as a public health issue, not a criminal issue.It urges the government to adopt the model instituted in 2001 in Portugal, where treatment and harm reduction services were expanded and criminal penalties eliminated for simple possession and consumption of illicit drugs.Anyone found in possession of an illegal drug in Portugal is ordered to appear before something called a dissuasion commission, which can refer the person for treatment or impose administrative sanctions, such as fines.But Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor says what works for a small country like Portugal wouldn't work in large country like Canada, where 10 different provinces have sole responsibility for delivering health care.Moreover, she notes that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has repeatedly drawn the line at legalizing recreational marijuana and doesn't intend to go further down that road with other, harder drugs.
Can medical marijuana help to fight the opioid epidemic? Many believe that it can. But a new study finds that people who use medical marijuana actually have higher rates of medical and non-medical prescription drug use—including pain relievers. The study appears in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), published by Wolters Kluwer.
TORONTO – According to a new national policy paper released today by the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), decriminalization is key to solving the opioid crisis that is killing thousands of people. The paper, developed by a cross-Canada team of mental health policy and research experts in response to escalating rates of opioid-related harms, recommends a bold and effective public health approach to relieving the crisis that focuses on care, not corrections.
HAMILTON, ON—A new study from McMaster and York universities has found that poor muscle health may be a complication of Type 1 diabetes, even among active twenty-somethings.The research team analyzed muscle biopsies of young adults with and without Type 1 diabetes who exceed Diabetes Canada's recommended weekly levels for physical activity.The researchers found structural and functional changes in the power generation parts of the cell, or mitochondria, of those with diabetes. Not only were the mitochondria less capable of producing energy for the muscle, they were also releasing high amounts of toxic reactive oxygen species, related to cell damage.These changes could result in reduced metabolism, greater difficulty controlling blood glucose and, if left unchecked, an accelerated rate of developing disability. The study findings add poor muscle health to the list of better-known complications of Type 1 diabetes, including nerve damage, heart disease and kidney disorders."Now we know that even active people with diabetes have changes in their muscles that could impair their ability to manage blood sugar," said Thomas Hawke, corresponding author of the study and a professor of pathology and molecular medicine at McMaster. "Knowing in the long term that this could contribute to faster development of disability, we can start to address it early on."Christopher Perry, study co-senior author and an associate professor in kinesiology and health sciences and the Muscle Health Research Centre at York University, added: "Skeletal muscle is our largest metabolic organ and is the primary tissue for clearing blood sugar after eating a meal, so we need to keep muscle as healthy as possible."With regular aerobic exercise, the amount of mitochondria in muscle increases, thereby helping muscle cells to use more glucose and become more efficient. Given this new data, Perry added that their study suggests that current guidelines for Type 1 diabetics may also need to be revised."We believe these dysfunctional mitochondria are what's causing the muscle to not use glucose properly and to also damage muscle cells in the process. We were surprised to see the muscles were this unhealthy in young adults with Type 1 diabetes who were regularly active."Researchers say while further study is needed, revising evidence-based exercise guidelines, specific for those with Type 1 diabetes, may be required to keep them in the best health.The paper was published today in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. The study may be found HERE.The team included researchers at York University, the University of Windsor and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases as well as McMaster's departments of pathology and molecular medicine, pediatrics and kinesiology. Both Hawke and Perry are on the Board of Directors for the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology.The study was funded in part by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, and the James H. Cummings Foundation.
DURHAM, N.C. – While women are two to four times more likely than men to tear the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knee, the cause of this injury is no different between the sexes, according to new research from Duke Health.
MISSOULA, MT – A University of Montana researcher and her collaborators have published a new study that reveals increased risks for Alzheimer's and suicide among children and young adults living in polluted megacities.
A recent study released by the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine shows a stunning number of participants not only experienced concussion-related symptoms and head impacts but also continued performing either without reporting the incident or without receiving the recommended care. These participants were not taking part in any sporting contest at the time, however. They are theater personnel.
People whose negative emotional responses to stress carry over to the following day are more likely to report health problems and physical limitations later in life compared with peers who are able to "let it go," according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
In an observational study of almost a half-million participants, Stanford researchers discovered an association between high fitness levels and low heart disease, even among those at genetic risk.
According to the Canadian Cancer Society, massage therapy is one of the most popular complementary therapies utilized by people living with cancer. While there is no evidence that suggests massage therapy can treat this disease, it is recognized for its efficacy in providing physical and emotional benefits to the cancer patient, helping improve their quality of life.
Australian scientists say they have edged closer to developing new pain relief medication from sea snails.
Nearly half of people who use a standing desk are at risk of developing lower back pain, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
Powerful opioid drugs are killing people in the northern city of Thunder Bay at a higher rate than anywhere else in Ontario, a new report states.
OTTAWA — The number of apparent opioid deaths in Canada in the first nine months of last year almost matched the figure for all of 2016.
OTTAWA — A new report is recommending a dramatic overhaul to the role the federal government and its arms-length organizations play in the Canadian healthcare system.
DURHAM, N.C. — For decades, Americans have been inundated with a confusing barrage of messages about how best to counteract the health risks of sedentary lifestyles: walk 10,000 steps a day; do a seven-minute workout from a phone app; flip heavy tires in an arduous boot camp class.
BERLIN, GERMANY — Pain therapy specialists Liebscher & Bracht have released the 2018 Pain Index, revealing trends in the way individuals experience chronic pain based on their gender, age and profession.
In a recent report by Doctor Francis D' Ambrosio, medical marijuana patients most successfully replaced medication with marijuana for a variety of different conditions, including cancer, epilepsy, depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, whose Liberals face an uphill battle in the spring provincial election after 15 years in office, countered her opponents' election promise of change with one of her own Monday, saying only her party can deliver "big change."
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