Research
The way we feel about being touched -- and the way we touch others -- are shaped by our personal and generational affective history. Touch inequalities, too, are often transmitted through generations, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Tampere shows. For the study, the researchers analysed a unique set of data, namely touch biographies.
Acute pain, e.g. hitting your leg against a sharp object, causes an abrupt, unpleasant feeling. In this way, we learn from painful experiences to avoid future harmful situations. This is called "threat learning" and helps animals and humans to survive. But which part of the brain actually warns other parts of the brain of painful events so that threat learning can occur?
In the dizzying swirl of health-related websites, social media and smartphone apps, finding a reliable source of health information can be a challenge. A group of researchers from the Johns Hopkins University schools of medicine and public health, as well as the university's Applied Physics Laboratory, have mapped out a course to navigate that complicated landscape.
Exercise helps to prevent the degradation of cartilage caused by osteoarthritis, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.
A six-week transition period did not help wearers adjust to "maximal" running shoes, indicating that increased impact forces and loading rates caused by the shoe design do not change over time, a new study from Oregon State University -- Cascades has found.
Knee injuries in adolescent females, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, are increasing in frequency.
As the main point of contact with the ground, the foot plays a vital role in how humans move.
In a new study conducted in rats, researchers found a four-week period of rest was nearly as effective as an experimental drug at reducing discomfort and regaining function after an injury from repeated moderate-strain activity. 
A woman in Scotland can feel virtually no pain due to a mutation in a previously-unidentified gene, according to a research paper co-led by UCL.
A research group at Hiroshima University observed a potential new target for chronic pain treatment. Further research using this receptor could lead to new, more effective drugs to use in pain-relieving treatment for chronic pain.
Post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, is a mental condition caused by a traumatic event. People with PTSD may experience intrusive memories, negative thoughts, anxiety and chronic pain. The condition is typically treated with a combination of psychotherapy, anti-depressants and anti-anxiety medications.
In an ongoing study exploring walking for health across the adult lifespan, University of Massachusetts Amherst kinesiology researchers found that walking cadence is a reliable measure of exercise intensity and set simple steps-per-minute guidelines for moderate and vigorous intensity.
The old adage "use it or lose it" tells us: if you stop using your muscles, they'll shrink. Until recently, scientists thought this meant that nuclei -- the cell control centers that build and maintain muscle fibers -- are also lost to sloth.
After amputation of an arm, most amputees report vivid and continuous sensations of their missing limb. Some can even move their missing hand as if it were still there. For many amputees, though, these sensations are painful and, unfortunately, there are no effective treatments for this pain.
Our eyes, ears and skin are responsible for different senses. Moreover, our brain assigns these senses to different regions: the visual cortex, auditory cortex and somatosensory cortex. However, it is clear that there are anatomical connections between these different cortices such that brain activation to one sense can influence brain activation to another.
Even among sleep researchers, it is a widely held belief that sleep quality can be improved by avoiding exercise in the evening. However, as researchers from the Institute of Human Movement Sciences and Sport at ETH Zurich have demonstrated, it is not generally true.
Losing just a couple hours of sleep at night makes you angrier, especially in frustrating situations, according to new Iowa State University research. While the results may seem intuitive, the study is one of the first to provide evidence that sleep loss causes anger.
For hockey great Bobby Orr, a torn knee ligament ended his career at age 30. Orr had more than 17 knee operations, at one point having his meniscus removed — the cartilaginous tissue that helps stabilize and lubricate the knee joint. Now scientists can see in real time just how important the meniscus is.
An intervention combining passive joint mobilization to realign the patellar (kneecap) position, along with exercise to maintain it, can reduce pain and improve function and quality in life in patients with knee osteoarthritis. 
Page 1 of 14

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine Renew

Most Popular

Marketplace


We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy Policy.