Wellness

For the first time in 11 years, Health Canada is gearing up to release a revamped food guide, even as debate continues beyond the pages of diet and wellness websites about the best foods to promote optimal health.
WASHINGTON DC—In a study1 published today in PLOS ONE, experts analyzed reams of past food and nutrition research to help identify and spur action in areas where meaningful improvements can be made in the design and execution of future food and nutrition studies. This is one of the first studies to use "Risk of Bias (ROB) domains," as defined by Cochrane, in this way. Researchers typically use ROB domains to evaluate the relative strengths of individual studies when conducting systematic reviews.
A new study suggests children in the U.S. begin consuming added sugar at a very young age and that many toddlers' sugar intake exceeds the maximum amount recommended for adults.
ATHENS, GA—Most children in the U.S. do not eat enough fruits and vegetables, some eating less than one serving of fruits and vegetables a day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Though there are multiple federal-level policies in place to ensure healthy options in school lunchrooms, these measures can't guarantee that kids will choose the fruit or vegetable option, let alone eat it.
The vast majority of doctors, naturopaths, dietitians and scientists all agree that having more omega-3 fats in our diet is good for our health.
While calories from any food have the potential to increase the risk of obesity and other cardiometabolic diseases, 22 nutrition researchers agree that sugar-sweetened beverages play a unique role in chronic health problems. The disease risk increases even when the beverages are consumed within diets that do not result in weight gain.
It turns out that making art can be a powerful therapeutic tool for adults, especially in the treatment and management of pain.
An athlete's body is regularly subjected to impact and trauma, which in the long run can lead to injury.
We all know we should exercise regularly, but it can be difficult to fit exercise into our busy schedules. Most people can only exercise before or after work, so it’s worth examining whether the time of day we exercise affects outcomes such as weight loss and sleep.
A new automated text messaging service may curb opioid abuse and reduce the likelihood of relapse while also decreasing treatment costs, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine and Epharmix, a St. Louis-based digital health company.
Exercise can reverse damage to sedentary, aging hearts and help prevent risk of future heart failure – if it's enough exercise, and if it's begun in time, according to a new study by cardiologists at UT Southwestern and Texas Health Resources.
As people settle back into the routine of school and work, the MS Society of Canada is reminding Canadians that multiple sclerosis is anything but a routine disease. MS affects each person differently and treatment options can vary drastically from person to person. Some choose pharmaceuticals. Some do not. To provide guidance, the MS Society has reached out to experts and those living with MS to create a MS Wellness Toolbox - filled with strategies to help those living with MS.
Google the word ''cannabis'' coupled with just about any disease – arthritis, epilepsy, even cancer – and there are all sorts of health claims made about what some have come to view as a potential wonder drug.
Cameras watch us almost everywhere we go. We know the internet tracks our searches and purchases, and our smartphones can be used to monitor our activities too. As sociologist David Lyon points out, “this is a culture of surveillance."
Researchers at York University's Faculty of Health have found that patients who have metabolic healthy obesity, but no other metabolic risk factors, do not have an increased rate of mortality.
A majority of American (and Canadian) workers spend most of their day sitting and don't get enough exercise, putting them at risk for a variety of chronic diseases ranging from diabetes to cancer.
UNIVERSITY PARK, PA—There may be some truth to the saying "getting up on the wrong side of the bed," according to Penn State researchers who say starting your morning by focusing on how stressful your day will be may be harmful to your mindset throughout the day.
TORONTO—A new report says kids with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other brain-based conditions could stand the most to gain from boosting physical activity.

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