Wellness

A new study suggests children in the U.S. begin consuming added sugar at a very young age and that many toddlers' sugar intake exceeds the maximum amount recommended for adults.
ATHENS, GA—Most children in the U.S. do not eat enough fruits and vegetables, some eating less than one serving of fruits and vegetables a day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Though there are multiple federal-level policies in place to ensure healthy options in school lunchrooms, these measures can't guarantee that kids will choose the fruit or vegetable option, let alone eat it.
The vast majority of doctors, naturopaths, dietitians and scientists all agree that having more omega-3 fats in our diet is good for our health.
While calories from any food have the potential to increase the risk of obesity and other cardiometabolic diseases, 22 nutrition researchers agree that sugar-sweetened beverages play a unique role in chronic health problems. The disease risk increases even when the beverages are consumed within diets that do not result in weight gain.
University of Sydney researchers aim to help clear up conflicting dietary advice around egg consumption, as a new study finds eating up to 12 eggs per week for a year did not increase cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes.
People who have a healthier diet throughout their adult lives are more likely to be stronger and fitter in older age than those who don't, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.
We all know we should exercise regularly, but it can be difficult to fit exercise into our busy schedules. Most people can only exercise before or after work, so it’s worth examining whether the time of day we exercise affects outcomes such as weight loss and sleep.
A new automated text messaging service may curb opioid abuse and reduce the likelihood of relapse while also decreasing treatment costs, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine and Epharmix, a St. Louis-based digital health company.
Exercise can reverse damage to sedentary, aging hearts and help prevent risk of future heart failure – if it's enough exercise, and if it's begun in time, according to a new study by cardiologists at UT Southwestern and Texas Health Resources.
As people settle back into the routine of school and work, the MS Society of Canada is reminding Canadians that multiple sclerosis is anything but a routine disease. MS affects each person differently and treatment options can vary drastically from person to person. Some choose pharmaceuticals. Some do not. To provide guidance, the MS Society has reached out to experts and those living with MS to create a MS Wellness Toolbox - filled with strategies to help those living with MS.
PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE, Man. – A new program is bringing Manitobans back to school with lessons in understanding mental health.
VANCOUVER – Too many men working in trades are overdosing on opioids, says a chief medical health officer in British Columbia who wants the industry to be involved in identifying interventions that could save lives.
Participating in yoga and mindfulness activities at school helps third-graders exhibiting anxiety improve their well-being and emotional health, according to a new Tulane University study published in the journal Psychology Research and Behavior Management.
Self-care. Self-renewal. They are vague concepts we push on our clients for their ‘take-home’ after a massage treatment. It all seems so achievable at the moment – but where to begin? Axe-throwing? A grown-up bouncy castle? As massage therapists, are we taking note of our own homework?
BOSTON—Researchers have demonstrated that a program aimed at helping people modify lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise is as effective as medication at reducing blood pressure.
New research has for the first time set a recommended upper limit of High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) at 30-40 minutes working out at above 90 per cent of the maximum heart rate per week.
BUFFALO, NY—New research by the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions has identified a key mechanism in how aerobic exercise can help impact the brain in ways that may support treatment — and even prevention strategies — for addiction.
Results from a UK study have added to the growing body of research that an active lifestyle can help offset the negative health effects of too much time spent sitting, suggesting that those who are fitter and stronger are less likely to be impacted by sedentary time.

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